Facebook Owner: Youngest Billionaire

5 03 2008
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Facebook founder is world’s youngest billionaire

Agence France-Presse

NEW YORK – Mark Zuckerberg, the 23-year-old founder of social networking site Facebook, is the youngest ever self-made billionaire, according to an annual list published by Forbes magazine.

“He is the youngest billionaire in the world right now and we also believe he is the youngest self-made billionaire in history,” said the magazine’s Associate Editor Matthew Miller, unveiling this year’s super-rich list.

The magazine put the former Harvard student’s personal wealth at 1.5 billion dollars, based on what it said was a conservative valuation of five billion dollars for Facebook and Zuckerberg’s estimated 30 percent stake.

It played down speculation that the site could be worth as much as 15 billion dollars, which was based on Microsoft paying 240 million dollars for a 1.6 percent stake in the company last year.

“Would it really fetch that much today? Some analysts — and a few Facebook investors — doubt it,” the magazine said. It said it based its valuation on Facebook’s estimated annual sales of 150 million dollars.

A billionaire at 23 years old, or the same age as me. That is so mind blowing to me. If I had a billion dollars, I could do so many things like produce a film, buy a tropical island, or donate millions to save an endangered species. Good for him, and as a Facebook user I’m not surprised that the owner is a billionaire. Facebook > Myspace




Architecture Profile: Frank Lloyd Wright

7 02 2008

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Since I want to get more involved in my major, I’m going to start doing profiles of architects who have tremendous effect on modern architecture and on me as a student studying architecture. The first one that I am doing is on Frank Lloyd Wright, who many view as one of the founding fathers of modern architecture. He is also arguably the most important architect in American history, up there with the likes of Thomas Jefferson, Phillip Johnson, and Frank Gehry.

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